Search Google Appliance

Bridgewater State University - logo

FinAid Code of Conduct

Mon, 06/06/2016 - 11:36 -- robbin
Question / Topic: 
Code of Conduct
Answer / Topic Details: 

The Bridgewater State University office of financial aid has adopted the following NASFAA and Massachusetts Board of Higher Education Statements of Ethical Principles and Codes of Conduct to ensure the highest ethical behavior and professional practices.

NASFAA STATEMENT OF ETHICAL PRINCIPLES
The office of financial aid at Bridgewater State University follows NASFAA’s Statement of Ethical Principles, which provides that the primary goal of the institutional financial aid professional is to help students achieve their educational potential by providing appropriate financial resources. To this end, this Statement provides that the financial aid professional shall:

  • Be committed to removing financial barriers for those who wish to pursue postsecondary learning.
  • Make every effort to assist students with financial need.
  • Be aware of the issues affecting students and advocate their interests at the institutional, state, and federal levels.
  • Support efforts to encourage students, as early as the elementary grades, to aspire to and plan for education beyond high school.
  • Educate students and families through quality consumer information.
  • Respect the dignity and protect the privacy of students, and ensure the confidentiality of student records and personal circumstances.
  • Ensure equity by applying all need analysis formulas consistently across the institution's full population of student financial aid applicants.
  • Provide services that do not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, disability, age, or economic status.
  • Recognize the need for professional development and continuing education opportunities.
  • Promote the free expression of ideas and opinions, and foster respect for diverse viewpoints within the profession.
  • Commit to the highest level of ethical behavior and refrain from conflict of interest or the perception thereof.
  • Maintain the highest level of professionalism, reflecting a commitment to the goals of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators.

Task Force on Standards of Excellence
Adopted by Board of Directors, April 1999


NASFAA CODE OF CONDUCT FOR INSTITUTIONAL FINANCIAL AID PROFESSIONALS
An institutional financial aid professional is expected to always maintain exemplary standards of professional conduct in all aspects of carrying out his or her responsibilities, specifically including all dealings with any entities involved in any manner in student financial aid, regardless of whether such entities are involved in a government sponsored, subsidized, or regulated activity. In doing so, a financial aid professional should:

  • Refrain from taking any action for his or her personal benefit.
  • Refrain from taking any action he or she believes is contrary to law, regulation, or the best interests of the students and parents he or she serves.
  • Ensure that the information he or she provides is accurate, unbiased, and does not reflect any preference arising from actual or potential personal gain.
  • Be objective in making decisions and advising his or her institution regarding relationships with any entity involved in any aspect of student financial aid.
  • Refrain from soliciting or accepting anything of other than nominal value from any entity (other than an institution of higher education or a governmental entity such as the U.S. Department of Education) involved in the making, holding, consolidating or processing of any student loans, including anything of value (including reimbursement of expenses) for serving on an advisory body or as part of a training activity of or sponsored by any such entity.
  • Disclose to his or her institution, in such manner as his or her institution may prescribe, any involvement with or interest in any entity involved in any aspect of student financial aid.

Adopted by Board of Directors, May 2007
NASFAA’s Statement of Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct for Institutional Financial Aid Professionals

MASSACHUSETTS BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION
CODE OF CONDUCT—STUDENT LOAN PROGRAMS

Code of Conduct
The primary goal of the institution and its financial aid staff is to help students achieve their educational potential by providing appropriate financial resources. To this end, this document provides institutions, specifically financial aid professionals, with a set of principles that serves as a common foundation for an acceptable standard of conduct.

Institutions and their Financial Aid Professionals shall:

  • Maintain the highest level of professionalism
  • Commit to the highest level of ethical behavior and refrain from conflict of interest or the perception thereof
  • Respect the dignity and protect the privacy of students, and ensure the confidentiality of student records and personal circumstances
  • Provide information to families for lenders that have proven to provide the best combination of price, access to funds, and service to students and families

Further, institutions shall ensure that all officers, trustees, directors, employees or agents, and financial aid professionals adhere to the following:

  • May not accept gifts, meals, travel, or any other non-trivial items from student loan providers in connection with the institution’s loan business
  • May not accept, from a lending institution, money, equipment, or printing services or anything of value that may provide or suggest an advantage or grant a preferred status
  • If serving as a member of a lending institution’s advisory board, may not accept anything of value in exchange for this service, such as “revenue sharing”

Bridgewater State University does not have a preferred lender list. Students may borrow from any lender they choose with no preference made by the University. The University utilizes www.ELMSelect.com to provide information to our students. This is not to be construed as an endorsement of those lenders included on ELM Select. Students may borrow from lenders not included on ELM Select.

 

Group ownership: 

CityLab Crucial Concentration Training Workshop

Wed, 11/04/2015 - 18:44 -- KMcCoy
Question / Topic: 
Crucial Concentration Training Workshop
Answer / Topic Details: 

This module introduces students to the use of micropipettes for measuring small volumes of liquid. Students perform colorimetric assays with spectrophotometers to determine the actual amount of protein in drinks. Math skills are involved in analyzing the data, including graphing and determining linear relationships between variables.

Most suitable for middle school students.

Group ownership: 

CityLab Mystery of the Crooked Cell Training Workshop

Wed, 11/04/2015 - 18:43 -- KMcCoy
Question / Topic: 
Mystery of the Crooked Cell Training Workshop
Answer / Topic Details: 

This module allows students to explore the molecular basis of sickle cell anemia. Acting as medical technologists, they are asked to determine what might be causing a collection of symptoms in an imaginary patient. Students will develop their micropipetting skills, and use protein gel electrophoresis as a diagnostic tool to differentiate sickle cell hemoglobin from normal hemoglobin. Pre-lab and post-lab activities help students explore the nature of this hereditary disease.  
Most suitable for middle school students.

Group ownership: 

CityLab Lab Larceny Training Workshop

Wed, 11/04/2015 - 18:42 -- KMcCoy
Question / Topic: 
Lab Larceny Training Workshop
Answer / Topic Details: 

This module allows students to perform DNA fingerprinting on samples isolated from “blood” found on site at the Forensics Institute of Bridgewater (FIB). Students will use techniques that are based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and involve agarose gel electrophoresis to resolve the DNA fingerprints. This activity also introduces students to micropipettes.
Most suitable for high school students.

Group ownership: 

CityLab Whale of a Mystery Training Workshop

Wed, 11/04/2015 - 18:41 -- KMcCoy
Question / Topic: 
Whale of a Mystery Training Workshop
Answer / Topic Details: 

In this week-long module, students are hired as a Junior Scientist for the Bridgewater Animal Forensics Institute (BAFL). On the first day of training, an important case arrives, requiring the students to determine if tissue samples sent from a field agent are those of illegally hunted, endangered whale species. During his activity, students will use investigative laboratory techniques, including protein extraction, quantification and gel electrophoresis, to solve a mystery related to the hunting of endangered Cetacean species.  Additionally, they will learn about the natural history of these amazing creatures and the results of these studies can be used to develop a presentation.

Most suitable for middle school students.

Group ownership: 

CityLab Lab Larceny

Wed, 11/04/2015 - 17:29 -- KMcCoy
Question / Topic: 
Lab Larceny
Answer / Topic Details: 

The Lab Larceny module is most appropriate for high school biology classes.  It is based on the Boston University School of Medicine's CityLab module “Case of the Crown Jewels.”

Lab Larceny is a forensic module where high school students are hired as employees of the Forensic Institute of Bridgewater (FIB).  The students will be introduced to techniques in micropipetting, and perform DNA fingerprinting analysis on samples isolated from “blood” found onsite at FIB where industrial espionage has occurred.  Students will also use techniques that are based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and use agarose gel electrophoresis to resolve the DNA fingerprints.  Careful analysis of the data and critical thinking skills are encouraged when solving this mystery.

Group ownership: 

CityLab Mystery of the Crooked Cell

Wed, 11/04/2015 - 17:28 -- KMcCoy
Question / Topic: 
Mystery of the Crooked Cell
Answer / Topic Details: 

This module is most appropriate for middle school classes where students explore the molecular basis of sickle cell anemia. Acting as medical technologists, they are asked to determine the cause for some symptoms in an imaginary patient. Students are introduced to micropipettes, and use protein gel electrophoresis as a diagnostic tool to differentiate sickle cell hemoglobin from normal hemoglobin. A language arts component is included as a form of assessment when students write a letter to the physician who "hired" them, describing their diagnosis and laboratory methods used. Pre-lab and post-lab activities included will help students explore the nature of this hereditary disease.

The Mystery of the Crooked Cell module was designed by the faculty and staff of Boston University School of Medicine's CityLab program. The activities have been modified by the BSU CityLab team.

Group ownership: 

CityLab Crucial Concentration

Wed, 11/04/2015 - 17:26 -- KMcCoy
Question / Topic: 
Crucial Concentration
Answer / Topic Details: 

The Crucial Concentration module is most appropriate for middle school classes. The students are "hired" by the Perfect Solution Company and challenged to investigate the protein content of sports drinks in the context of "truth in advertising.” This module introduces students to the use of micropipettes for measuring small volumes of liquid, and students perform colorimetric assays with spectrophotometers to determine the actual amount of protein in drinks from three different manufacturers.  Math skills are involved in analyzing the data, including graphing and determining linear relationships between variables.

The Crucial Concentration module, including an introductory lesson on micropipettes, was designed by faculty and staff of BUSM CityLab.  The BSU CityLab team has modified and adapted the original program.

Group ownership: 

CityLab Pipetting 101

Wed, 11/04/2015 - 17:24 -- KMcCoy
Question / Topic: 
Pipetting 101
Answer / Topic Details: 

The Pipetting 101 module is most appropriate for students in grades 5 through 12. This module introduces students to micropipettes.  These precision instruments have become standard equipment in most biotechnology and medical laboratories, but they remain beyond the budget for many school science laboratories. Sections of this module are included in each of the other BSU CityLab modules, especially the Crucial Concentration module. The activities in Pipetting 101 also introduce students to the concept of an assay. Pre-lab activities are included and recommended for students who would benefit from review in metric measuring and math concepts.

This module was developed with assistance from the faculty and staff at Boston University School of Medicine's CityLab program.

Group ownership: 

Pages

Subscribe to Bridgewater State University RSS